The Orange Lilies film shorts

shot_1493220388754.jpgJust to let you know about the new four short films we’ve created with young people from Brighton & Hove about life in the city in WWI supported by film maker Tracey Gue for The Orange Lilies – Brighton & Hove in the Somme project.

They’re a talented bunch!

You can see them online on You Tube, link here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEhJKbkBIHqf4dJQ7mnptzYi_qqn3yp2O

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Our final event!

20170630_170652-e1499443215907.jpgWe marked the end of our The Orange Lilies – Brighton & Hove in the Somme project with a big community history event on 30th June 2017 at Jubilee Library in Brighton.

It was a roaring success with a great variety of speakers and around 150 visitors to the drop in day, listening to presentations, visiting stalls and exhibitions at the venue, followed by the unveiling of a memorial stone to those who fell at The Battle of Boar’s Head on 30th June 1916.

Just to say a huge thank you for your support and delivery for The Orange Lilies project since June 2016.
Your time and expertise has really served to make the project happen and is so very much appreciated. I really can’t thank you enough for your involvement!
We are still uploading research to the project website, so things won’t end right away, but in terms of project delivery we are now complete.
I must say it’s come round far too soon and I feel in some ways like we’ve just got started, so am sad to finish, but on to projects new for now.
We’ve had great feedback from visitors for the day in general and also each specific session. The day was a real success and we had around 150 visitors ongoing through the day to hear your presentations. I hope you enjoyed it too!
‘I was glad to catch Geoffrey Mead’s talk. Fascinating!’
‘The speakers were of an extremely high standard’
‘Chris Kempshall’s talk was my favourite part’
‘A fascinating day, thank you!’
‘Really enjoyed it’
‘The speakers were all inspirational, amusing, entertaining, relevant and inspiring’
‘It was an illuminating and fascinating day of events’
‘All the presentations (including the Q+A) were of an extremely high standard’
‘Many congratulations on a superb project’
If you’d like to join the Strike a Light mailing list for future project activities and events, do let me know and I’ll add you to the newsletter. 
To keep up with us in other ways you can ‘Follow’ the Strike a Light website – https://strikealight.org/
or on Twitter – @strikerlight

 

Herbert Henry Boxall

Herbert Henry Boxall was born on the 26th March 1884 in Bury, West Sussex. He died in 1975 at Worthing living 91 years. His regiment was the Sussex Yeomanry.

 Home life

Herbert was the third child to Walter and Harriet Boxall. Herbert had two elder brothers Louis b.1879, Walter b.1882. He also had a younger sister Edith b. 22nd May 1990. In 1891 all the children were attending the local school.

In 1901 all three of the boys are following in their father’s footsteps as Blacksmiths.

On 7th April 1909 Herbert became a Police Constable with the Brighton Borough Police Force. It is not known where he was living at the time but within the 1911 Census, three years later; it is revealed that he was living as a boarder at 82 Coventry Street, Preston. (This is Preston Village, Brighton).

Military career

There appears to be no traceable Military records available for Herbert Boxall at this time although this matter will be reviewed. It is known that Herbert Boxall applied for permission to join the Army and was given permission to leave Brighton Borough Police by Chief Constable William Gentle on 19th May 1915.

Other Police officers that were given permission to leave the Brighton Borough Police Force on the same day included Sidney Barrow, Thomas Ford, Ernest Griggs, Henry Hayter, Charles Moorey and George Sutton.

It is not known at present whether Herbert went to war or remained with the Yeomanry.

Post war

It is known that Herbert rejoined Brighton Borough Police on 14th August 1919 along with Richard Lintott, Sydney Millen, Jack Cheesman, Christopher Gaston, Clifford Gaston, and Arthur Avis.

It can be presumed that Herbert Boxall did his bit for King and Country but it is not known where. The 1939 Register is our next insight to Herbert’s life which finds him alive and well living back at his parent’s home at Bury Gate. Herbert is living with his 87 year old mother Harriet along with his sister Edith.

Herbert is shown as a retired Police Inspector. (No trace can be found of his promotions). He is single and appears never to have married.

Herbert died on 11th April 1975 at 95 years of age at Swan Cottage, Rackham, Pulborough. His death is registered in Worthing.

Probate was registered in London on 23rd June 1975. Herbert’s estate was valued at £4018.

Copyright Researched and reported by Ian Borthwick 2017, Retired Sussex Police Officer AB579. Served between Nov 1976 to March 2007.

Arthur Henry Avis

 Arthur Henry Avis, was born on the 9th May 1889 in Rottingdean, Brighton, Sussex.

 

Family life

The Avis family appear to have lived in Rottingdean for several generations. Arthur’s parents are both from Rottingdean and despite a few years in London where they were both servants they returned to Rottingdean with young children.

1889 saw the birth of Arthur Henry Avis but unfortunately his father died the same year.

Home life

Arthur was the youngest of four children. He had 2 brothers and a sister. The children were brought up by their mother living on her own. At the age of 11 Arthur was a milk boy along with his 13 yr old brother according to the 1901 Census. By the age of 21 he was a Gardener living as a boarder in The Lodge, St Mary’s Hall, Brighton (1911 Census).

On 5th October 1914 Arthur became a Police Constable with the Brighton Borough Police Force.

Military career

Arthur Avis appears on both WW1 Plaques within The Old Police Museum Cells at Brighton Town Hall. They are shown to be with The Royal Sussex Regiment.
The exact location of where these memorials were originally hung is at this moment lost in time. It is known however that both were recovered from the Old Wellington Road Police Station by author and historian, Retired Police Constable David Rowland and safely deposited in store within the basement of Brighton Police Station, John Street.

Arthur Henry Avis received permission to join the Army from the then Chief Constable Mr William Gentle on 12th May 1915. He left the Police on the same and day attested to join the Army on 12th May 1915. He stated his age was 26yrs, a Police Constable living at Garden Cottage, Rottingdean.

Other Police Officers that had applied for permission to join the Army are shown below.

All are released on the same day as Avis;=.

Edward Eade, Edmund N Funnell, Christopher Gaston, Clifford Gaston, William Daniels, William J Berry, Frederick Stephenson, George Simmons, Samuel V Kitchener and Ernest Lynn.

Arhur Avis has a service number of GS/6822 which is consistent with joining The Royal Sussex Regiment between 2nd May 1915 and 1st June 1915. The “GS” signifies those that joined up for General Service but was not always prefixed on their records. He showed his next of kin as his mother Susan giving the address as Garden Cottage, Rottingdean.

Arthur was initially sent for training with the 10th Battalion on 25th May 1915 at Colchester where he also received training in Stretcher bearing and First Aid on 8th September 1915. Several other recruits were from Brighton Borough Police.

He was at Shoreham between 13th September and 29th October 1915.

On 29th October 1915 he went to Weymouth 8th Battalion Depot for Pioneer training.

The 8th Battalion was formed as a new army unit under the recruitment drive launched soon after the outbreak of the war by the Secretary of State Lord Kitchener and although initially formed as an Infantry unit it was converted to a Pioneer Battalion. The 8th played a less active fighting part in the war; its main role was to be one of support, involving hard physical work. That said the 8th Battalion were still fully trained soldiers and they were required to carry all the same equipment as a normal soldier and be prepared to fight.

On 19th November 1915 Arthur joined the British Expeditionary Force and disembarked at Etaples. The Battalion formed part of the 18th Eastern Division.

The war diary of the 8th Battalion contains a mass of detail concerning map references, geographical positions and an amazing amount of technical information on all aspects of the pioneering work carried out, but sadly contains very little information of the non-pioneering activities of the Battalion.

It is known that Arthur would have caught up with his Battalion in or around Albert, just North of the River Somme. The Battalion was committed to general work on defences, which included trenches, dugouts, shelters and billets and remained in the area for December and into 1916 enduring heavy snow at the end of February.

March 1917 saw the beginning of the preparation for the “Big Push” planned for the 1st July 1916. The 18th had started to dig “Russian Saps” from the divisional front line, beneath “No Man’s Land” The Russian Saps were shallow underground tunnels through which men could pass to the attack unseen by the enemy. Arthur would not have seen the completion of the Saps.

In 1916 Army Council instruction No. 1733 was issued with regards to The Military Police. The instruction is long and tedious but in short explains that the system of Policing such large numbers of Soldiers at home and abroad required trained Police Officers. As a result it would appear that soldiers who were Police Officers prior to the war were being transferred to either the MMP (Mounted Military Police) or MFP (Military Foot Police).

The General Duties of a Military Police Officer include:

(1) The detection of crime, and the arrest of offenders.

(2) The maintenance of order under all circumstances.

(3) The surveillance and control of all civilians and followers within the area occupied by their formations.

(4) Assisting in maintaining march discipline of troops and transport and in regulating traffic.

(5) The collection of stragglers.

(6) The custody of prisoners of war until their transfer to railhead or to a P.O.W. working company.

(7) The protection of the local inhabitants against acts of violence on the part of soldiers or followers.

In addition there were numerous special duties they were expected to see to, amongst which were :—

Taking measures to prevent troops getting into contact with undesirable characters—prostitutes, enemy agents, provocateurs, etc. Ill-treatment of animals. Civilians found within the lines without passes or identity cards. Plundering, marauding and looting. Ill-treatment of inhabitants. Soldiers and civilians trafficking in rations or Government property. Unauthorized cameras and photography. Collecting and returning of horses. Careless talk and the apprehension of anyone giving military information. Arrest of suspicious individuals. The shooting of dogs found unattended near the forward lines, and search of the bodies for messages, etc. Seizure of carrier pigeons. Surveillance for means of communication with the enemy.

On 23rd April 1917 Arthur was temporarily transferred to the Military Foot Police for the duration of the war. He is promoted to Lance Corporal and his new service number is P10428.

On 9th May 1917 he joined up with the 1st Army at Pernes in France until 6th July 1918 when he was transferred to the 5th Army “in the field”. He was still serving with the 5th Army on 15th May 1919. On 6th July 1919 Arthur was sent to Boulogne for transfer to England for demobilization via Wimereux, France.

On 8th July Arthur is at the Crystal palace dispersal unit along with the Gaston twins where he is granted 28 days furlough. (Leave)On 4th August 1919 Arthur is transferred to Class Z army reserve. His address is 67 Bates Road, Brighton.

Arthur would have been awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal and most likely the 1914-1915 Star although the army records do not show this. A medal card cannot be found.

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Victory Medal

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British War Medal

Post war

Arthur rejoins Brighton Police on 14th August 1919, having served the Colours for 4yrs and 3 monthsAt the age of 36 in 1925, Arthur married a probable divorcee (not a widow) Ethel Frances Maud Nickolls nee Finbow. Ethel already had two children from her previous marriage to Christopher George Nickolls. Harry Joshua Charles Frederick Nickolls aged 15 years and Bernard James Nickolls aged 11yrs. On 31st August 1926 Ethel gave birth to a daughter Gwendoline.

The 1939 Register shows Arthur, still a Police Officer, living at 13 Gerrard Street Brighton with his wife Ethel and their daughter Gwendoline.

Arthur died in Brighton in 1946 aged 57 and Ethel died 17 years later in 1946 aged 75.

Research problems- The only research problem was a lack of Medal Card. Copyright Researched and reported by Ian Borthwick 2017, Retired Sussex Police Officer AB579, Served between Nov 1976 to March 2007.

Sydney Millen

The Millen family appear to have lived in the Bethersden area of Kent for several generations. Sydney’s parents are both from farming backgrounds and working within the “Garden of England”.

On 5th November 1884 Sydney Millen was born in Bethersden. His parents Thomas and Elizabeth were married in 1872 in Kent. Sydney was born into a large family already having five elder Siblings.

The 1901 Census of England and Wales finds the family living at Star Farm in Bethersden, Kent. Sydney has three elder brothers, Harold 18, Herbert 16 and Percival 14, two elder sisters, Alice 11 and Bessie 9. He also now has a younger brother Ashley  aged 2.

Home life

The 1901 Census finds Sydney as a 16 year old servant. He is working on Buxford Farm, Great Chart, as a Milkman. Great Chart is just one hours walk away from his parents’ house.

The rest of his family has moved to Bean Place, Bethersden. Sydney’s father Thomas is now a farmer with his own farm. The family has a new son Spencer who was born in 1891. Harold is married with children. He is still living in Bethersden. Bessie is a Servant working in Tunbridge Wells.

On 2nd April 1908 Sidney became a Police Constable with the Brighton Borough Police Force. It is not known where he was living.

The 1911 Census for England and Wales finds Sydney as a boarder at 21 Quebec Street, Brighton. Sydney is shown as a Police Constable with Brighton Borough Police.

The head of the house at 21 Quebec Street is Benjamin Welch also a Police Constable with Brighton Borough Police. There is also another boarder living at the house, Alfred Birkin, who is also a Police Constable with Brighton Borough Police. No enquiries have been made with regards to Welch and Birkin as they fall outside of the terms of reference as neither appears on the Brighton Borough Police WW1 Plaques.
Military career

Sydney Millen appears on both WW1 Plaques within The Old Police Museum Cells at Brighton Town Hall. He is shown to be with The Royal Sussex Regiment.
Sydney Millen received permission to join the Army from the then Chief Constable Mr William Gentle on 11th May 1915. He left the Police on the same day and attested to join the Army. He stated his age was 30yrs and 6 months, a Police Constable living at 36 Grove Street, Brighton.

Sydney Millen has a service number of GS/6818 which is consistent with joining The Royal Sussex Regiment between 2nd May 1915 and 1st June 1915. The “GS” signifies those that joined up for General Service but was not always prefixed on their records.

He showed his next of kin as his father Thomas giving the address as Bean Place, Bethersden, Kent.

 

 

Sydney was initially sent for training with the 10th Battalion on 21st May 1915 at Colchester. On 8th September Sydney passed a course of instruction in stretcher bearing and first aid. 

On 29th October 1915 Sydney was posted to Weymouth 8th Battalion Depot for Pioneer training. The 8th Battalion was formed as a new army unit under the recruitment drive launched soon after the outbreak of the war by the Secretary of State Lord Kitchener and although initially formed as an Infantry unit it was converted to a Pioneer Battalion. The 8th played a less active fighting part in the war; its main role was to be one of support, involving hard physical work. That said the 8th Battalion were still fully trained soldiers and they were required to carry all the same equipment as a normal soldier and be prepared to fight.

The war diary of the 8th Battalion contains a mass of detail concerning map references, geographical positions and an amazing amount of technical information on all aspects of the pioneering work carried out, but sadly contains very little information of the non-pioneering activities of the Battalion.

It is known that Sydney would have caught up with his Battalion in or around Albert, just North of the River Somme. The Battalion was committed to general work on defences, which included trenches, dugouts, shelters and billets and remained in the area for December and into 1916 enduring heavy snow at the end of February.

March 1916 saw the beginning of the preparation for the “Big Push” planned for the 1st July 1916. The 18th had started to dig “Russian Saps” from the divisional front line, beneath “No Man’s Land” The Russian Saps were shallow underground tunnels through which men could pass to the attack unseen by the enemy.

By the time the Battle of the Somme started on 1st July 1916 the Battalion had completed eight “Russian Saps” to within 20yds of the German front line.

On 25th June, with day and night bombardment of the German positions continuing the 8th Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment came under orders to be prepared to forsake pioneering duties and to fight as infantrymen.

On the fateful day of 1st July 1916 the 8th Battalion, despite heavy losses, achieved all of its targets.

The first of July has been described as the worst day in the History of the British Army who sustained 57,000 casualties 19,200 of them fatal and approximately 40% of them in the first hour.

 

There were several incidents that the 8th Battalion were involved in up until 21st July 1916 when they marched on and off for two weeks until arriving at Erquinghem-Sur-Lys  where they spent nearly 3 weeks training and constructing gun pits with the Engineers.

 

On 25the August the Battalion returned to the Somme battlefields. On 14th September 1916 Sydney was promoted to Lance Corporal and on 22nd the Battalion moved to assist in the attack of the German stronghold Thiepval. The 18th Division including the 8th Battalion successfully captured Thiepval that had held out against all other allied attacks since 1st July.

The War Record does not show any Leave dates for Sydney but, on 27th December 1916 he has returned to England. He married Lucy Mary Stewart at St Nicholas Church, Sturry, Kent.

 

Early 1917 saw the 8th Battalion conducting pioneering work where they were ballasting a communications tram line from Ovillers. Pioneering work continued from January through to April.

In 1916 Army Council instruction No. 1733 was issued with regards to The Military Police. The instruction is long and tedious but in short explains that the system of Policing such large numbers of Soldiers at home and abroad required trained Police Officers. As a result it would appear that soldiers who were Police Officers prior to the war were being transferred to either the MMP (Mounted Military Police) or MFP (Military Foot Police).

The General Duties of a Military Police Officer include:

(1) The detection of crime, and the arrest of offenders.

(2) The maintenance of order under all circumstances.

(3) The surveillance and control of all civilians and followers within the area occupied by their formations.

(4) Assisting in maintaining march discipline of troops and transport and in regulating traffic.

(5) The collection of stragglers.

(6) The custody of prisoners of war until their transfer to railhead or to a P.O.W. working company.

(7) The protection of the local inhabitants against acts of violence on the part of soldiers or followers.

In addition there were numerous special duties they were expected to see to, amongst which were :—

Taking measures to prevent troops getting into contact with undesirable characters—prostitutes, enemy agents, provocateurs, etc.

Ill-treatment of animals.

Civilians found within the lines without passes or identity cards.

Plundering, marauding and looting.

Ill-treatment of inhabitants.

Soldiers and civilians trafficking in rations or Government property.

Unauthorized cameras and photography.

Collecting and returning of horses.

Careless talk and the apprehension of anyone giving military information.

Arrest of suspicious individuals.

The shooting of dogs found unattended near the forward lines, and search of the bodies for messages, etc.

Seizure of carrier pigeons.

Surveillance for means of communication with the enemy.

 

On 23rd April 1917 Sydney was temporarily transferred to the Military Foot Police for the duration of the war. He remains a Lance Corporal and his new service number is P10414.

Sydney’s mother Lucy died in the first quarter of 1917. His father Thomas died on Christmas day 1917.

On 9th May 1917 he joined up with the 1st Army at Pernes in France. He was still serving with the 1st 25th August 1918. On 28th April Sydney was sent to England on leave returning on 10th May. On 15th June 1919 Sydney was again home in England on leave, rejoining the 1st Army on 28th June 1919.On 11th August 1919 Sydney is transferred to Class Z army reserve. His address is Howe Farm Cottage, Sturry, Canterbury, Kent.

Sydney was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal although at the time there was confusion over the spelling of his name. Medals were initially issued to MILLER and not MILLEN. The medals had to be returned and re-issued.

 

Post war

Sydney rejoins Brighton Police on 14th August 1919 along with other returning Police Officers. In 1919 Sydney and his wife Lucy have their first baby, a daughter Mary E Millen  is born. In 1922 a son Sydney W Millen is born. On 4th September 1950 Harold, Sydney’s eldest brother died. Sydney survived his wife by only two years, he died in 1973. His death is registered in Thanet.

 

Private Clement Trill – Royal Sussex Regiment

Clement Trill, was a Private in the 13th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment (SD 2803). He fought at the Battle of the Boars Head at  Richebourg L’Avoué, on the 30th of June 1916 and died the next day on the 1st July 1916 of his injuries at the age of 29 years. Trill is buried at Merville Communal Cemetery, France.

Clement Trill’s Brother, Lance Corporal Charles Tower Trill, was in the 7th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. He too was killed in action during an attack on German positions at Ovillers on the Somme on 7th July 1916, aged 21 years. Lance Corporal Charles Tower Trill is Buried Ovillers Military Cemetery, France.

Family

Clement Trill was born in 1888 to Henry James Trill (born 1856 and died 1911) and Elizabeth Bardwell (died 1921). Henry and Elizabeth married in 1880 and lived in Brighton. They had seven children: Fredrick (b. 1881), Edith Maud (b. 1882), Dennis (b. 1884), Clement (b.1888) and Gertrude Eva (b. 1891), Florence (b. 1893) and Charles (b. 1902). In 1901 The family are recorded to be living in Chancellors Park in Keymer, Sussex.

 

Clement Trill married Violet Davies (born 1898). They had one son named Clement R. Trill who was born in Dartford in 1916. In 1939 Clement R. is recorded to be living with his mother Violet at 19B Madeira Place and his profession is stated as an electrician and plant maintenance person at Allen West.

Military career:

Clement enlisted in Brighton into the 13th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. The battalion crossed to Le Havre from Southampton on 5/6 March 1916. Clement’s regimental number is consecutive to that of Albury TURNER (SD 2804 – who was born in Coventry but whose family had returned to Brighton.  Albury Turner was presumed to have died at the Battle of Boar’s Head).

Clement was wounded at the Battle of Boar’s Head and died the following day of his wounds. The attack was frustrated by heavy machine gun fire from the Germans on to the left flank of the advance, and the fact that the smoke which was supposed to obscure the advance from the enemy’s sight drifted across no-man’s-land and made it virtually impossible for the men to see where they should be going and this caused confusion.  

The war diary for the battalion merely notes that casualties were “very heavy” and no estimate is given of how many men were killed or injured.  However, it was later reckoned that 360 men died and over 1100 were injured or missing hence “The Day Sussex Died”.

On the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Comprehensive Report it shows that Clement’s headstone gives his age, his regiment, date of death and the inscription “In ever loving memory from his wife and little son.”

He is commemorated on the Newick war memorial.

Post war:

Violet gave birth to their son, Clement, in the July to September quarter of 1916.  Violet does not appear to have remarried and died in Hove in 1956.  Clement Jr. married Daisy Edwards in 1940 and did not serve in the Second World War as he seems to have been in a reserved occupation whilst working at Allen West in Brighton.  In the 1939 record Clement is living at 19B Madeira Place and he is described as an “electrician and plant maintenance person”.

The other Trill boys:

Sadly Clement’s youngest brother, Charles died just six days after him and is buried in Ovillers Military Cemetery.

Frederick Henry Trill also served and was apart of the Rhine Army. He married Florence Paul in 1972. Frederick died in Camden Town in 1957 and Florence died the following year.

Dennis Bardwell Trill also served with the Royal Sussex Regiment (G5757). He died in Brighton in 1958.

 

The Orange Lilies

The Orange Lilies project runs until July 2017, and we have free events and activities taking place throughout the rest of the project.

We have been uploading memories and research to our project website which we’d love you to view.

Visit and view our textiles banner about the impact of the Somme on the city, and a selection of films made by young people about the centenary of the battle in an exhibition of our work at Jubilee Library in the Youth area from now until 4th July.

Visit our project site for further information

Funded by The Heritage Lottery Fund

https://theorangelilies.wordpress.com/

Brighton & Hove in WWI – Free event day: Friday 30th June 2017

We welcome you to a free event day exploring Brighton and Hove during WWI and showcasing two related projects The Orange Lilies – Brighton & Hove in the Somme (Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage), and The Boys on The Plaque (Fabrica gallery).
 
We’ve got a great series of speakers throughout the day, and a lunchtime Q & A session, so bring a packed lunch, grab a cup of tea from Temptations cafe in the library, hear some fascinating tales, and watch archive film footage of Brighton and Hove a hundred years ago.
 
There will also be a book launch for The Boys on the Plaque project, and an exhibition based at Jubilee Library for The Orange Lilies project.
 
The event is a drop in event, but welcome to come all day!
 
Free to attend, but please book a place: Brighton & Hove in WWI – Free event day

B&H in WWI event 30th June 2017

Brighton & Hove in WWI – Free event day

Free WWI Community history event marking the end of both The Orange Lilies – Brighton & Hove in the Somme, and The Boys on the Plaque projects; exploring Brighton & Hove in WWI.

& Launch of The Boys on the Plaque book

Venue: Jubilee Library, Brighton, 11am – 4.30pm – 30th June 2017

Speakers

11 – 11.20am: Introductions by Nicola Benge, The Orange LiliesProject Manager & Clare Hankinson, The Boys on the PlaqueProject Manager

11.20am – 12.10pm: Dr Frank Gray – Director of Screen Archive South East shows vintage film clips & discusses Brighton during WWI

12.15 – 1.30pm: Brighton & Hove in WWI Q & A – chaired by Dr Sam Carroll + Speakers: Dr Chris Kempshall, Dr Alison Fell, Dr Geoffrey Mead & Dr Frank Gray

1.35– 2.25pm: Dr Alison Fell – First World War Women workers and strikes

2.35 – 3.25pm: Dr Chris Kempshall – Brighton, The Boar’s Head, and the Somme

3.30 – 4.20pm: Dr Geoffrey Mead – Laundry maids and Fishermen – Aspects of work in WW1 Brighton

4.45pm onwards: Unveiling of new Battle of Boars Head memorial at The Steine War Memorial, Brighton

With:

Battle of Boar’s Head exhibition courtesy of Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove; The Boys on the Plaque project resources, WWI exhibitions and resources from Brighton & Hove Libraries, Gateways to the First World War, and The Royal British Legion.

Venue – Jubilee Library, Jubilee St, Brighton BN1 1GE

Queries to: theorangelilies@gmail.com

Websites:

theorangelilies.wordpress.com

boysontheplaque.wordpress.com

The Orange Lilies project is delivered by Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage

The Boys on the Plaque project is delivered by Fabrica gallery

Both in Partnership with the following organisations:

Brighton and Hove Libraries and Information Service, and Gateways to the First World War

with support from

Heritage Lottery Fund

Minnie Turner – Suffragette talk at Brighton Museum this week

The free talk we have organised for both The Orange Lilies project and The Boys on the Plaque WWI project is this Friday 12th May at Brighton Museum. 
Meet at the entrance to the museum
 
The Orange Lilies project is lucky to be having an illustrated talk at Brighton Museum this week about the famed Minnie Turner, a Brighton suffragette in the lead to and during WWI.
This will include looking at original suffragette local Brighton objects from a 100 years ago, as it will be a private event for us, with gallery enactor Karen Antoni.
This is a great way for  project researchers to find out more about the home front in Brighton and Hove during our project period (1916 and the Somme). you can read more about Minnie here: https://theorangelilies.wordpress.com/blog/
The talk takes place at Brighton Museum on Friday 12th May 1-4pm. FREE. Meet at the museum entrance.
Please RSVP to theorangelilies@gmail.com

Brighton WWI film showing – 2nd May

5 children and itYou are warmly invited to a special free film screening for primary school groups to explore the subject of WWI and Brighton’s local history.
Tuesday 2 May 2017
 
10am – 12.15pm
Space are limited, booking essential. Please contact clare.hankinson@fabrica.org.uk to make a booking or for any enquiries. 
 
You are very welcome to stay for the film or head off once it starts. We aim to finish the whole event by 12.15pm.
Refreshments and popcorn will be provided free.
Presented as part of The Orange Lilies project
This event takes place at Fabrica art gallery, 40 Duke Street, Brighton, BN1 1AG

As part of The Orange Lilies – Brighton & Hove in the Somme project, we’ll be involving children and teachers of local primary school Middle Street Primary School in our explorations of the city during the Somme in 1916.

We’re inviting WWI historian Dr Chris Kempshall to speak to the pupils about this period of history in an engaging and lively way.
We’ll follow this with a film showing of the First World War linked Five Children and It, and make popcorn too!
When Britain entered the First World War it did not fully realise that the conflict would soon touch upon the lives of everyone; even children.
Dr Chris Kempshall will discuss how the people of East Sussex lived under the shadow of the First World War, and how local children became involved in the war effort.
The screening is for 32 x year 5 children and 3-4 teachers.
Thanks to Heritage Lottery Fund for helping with this event, and to Fabrica gallery for organising it on behalf of Strike a Light – Arts & Heritage.